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Friday, 21 September 2007

Repairing our institutions....

I P A Manning is calling for a change in the way Zambia manages its wildlife and protected areas starting with some reforms for the seemingly hapless ZAWA. The problems highlighted are prevalent in many of Zambia's instutions and the solutions could well be the same:

The Zambia Wildlife Authority (ZAWA), with one man at the helm with any experience and the qualifications to back it up, Dr Lewis Saiwana, is beyond repair, beyond reconstruction. That it has not even made the necessary pension contributions for its own staff is proof that it is time to call it a day. At HQ, ZAWA is a shambles, unable to pay consultants as promised, unable to administer the hunting industry and the quota system, unable to pay all the Community Resource Boards who are responsible for hiring village scouts, unable to answer a simple letter.

It is time for Government to accept that the management of protected areas and its wildlife, and the wildlife of customary areas, can no longer be run by a highly centralized statutory body with a weak supervisory board. It is time to put all National Parks and Forests out to public private partnerships, and in customary areas, to place the ownership of wildlife in the hands of development trusts which incorporate customary leaders, local councils, the villagers and NGOs.

3 comments:

  1. At HQ, ZAWA is a shambles, unable to pay consultants as promised, unable to administer the hunting industry and the quota system, unable to pay all the Community Resource Boards who are responsible for hiring village scouts, unable to answer a simple letter.

    Although we shouldn't confuse the issue of centralisation with underfunding...

    It is time to put all National Parks and Forests out to public private partnerships, and in customary areas, to place the ownership of wildlife in the hands of development trusts which incorporate customary leaders, local councils, the villagers and NGOs.

    I like the call for decentralization, although I don't know the writer's real intent.

    I also think that too much of the country has been designated as wildlife areas.

    However, here is an interesting website from South Africa's Independent Development Trust.

    http://www.idt.org.za/index.php

    I'm not yet familiar with their pros and cons, so stay tuned.

    From their page:

    There must be a greater focus on redistribution and building a sustainable life for all people. We need to listen to what people want, rather than supply communities with what we think they need. This is the IDT's strength" The IDT is positioning itself through its work and successes as a leading developmental player, on the South African development landscape....

    If we don't follow their example to the letter, at least lessons can be learned from them.

    ReplyDelete
  2. his is an very interesting file with a wealth of data on rural development from the same website:

    http://www.idt.org.za/resources/strategy_document2.pdf

    THE INTEGRATED SUSTAINABLE RURAL DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY (ISRDS)

    1c) Decentralisation

    12. Growing evidence suggests that appropriately empowered and trained rural
    local governments can make an important contribution to rural development. In this
    context, it is important that centrally designed systems of inter-governmental fiscal
    transfers provide appropriate incentives for local governments. These incentives can
    be supported by ensuring that budgetary flows are transparent, predictable and
    autonomous.


    This document is really rich in information - read it.

    I have another idea.

    Years ago, there was a computer game called SimCity. Maybe a program can be developed that would help visualize development and costs, so it would be accessible to people other than architects and council people.

    http://simcity.ea.com/screenshots.php

    ReplyDelete
  3. MrK,

    Thanks for the links!

    Looks like a very useful document....I'll have a read...

    On the SimCity idea..I am sure similar models exist..but I am not sure the extent to which Zambian local authorities use them in urban planning...

    ReplyDelete

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