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Wednesday, 9 April 2008

Clive Chirwa's Vision for Zambia

I have previously criticised presidential aspirant Clive Chirwa's vision (or lack of) for Zambian aviation. Now you can reach your own conclusion on his broader vision for the nation. Here is the presentation he gave at LSE in full:

Part 1


Part 2


Part 3


Part 4

15 comments:

  1. Excellent video.

    I was especially impressed with prof. Chirwa's emphasis on education and industrialisation.

    Especially the emphasis on creating internal supply chains (or vertical integration - putting an emphasis on creating whole industries instead of just companies) is something that we have discussed before as PowerNomics from dr. Claud Anderson.

    I would like to expand on that with two issues:

    1) Agriculture

    Agriculture has a huge potential for job creation, wealth retention and the slowing of urbanisation. Organic agriculture is sustainable, and will keep land available for many generations to come. The government, through public words projects, can do a lot to improve hydrology, making water available for farmers irrespective of the rains. That too will boost output. And there should be land redistribution and security of tenure (in that order) for farmers. There is a huge potential for small agricultural dams, which would keep water on the land.

    2) Infrastructure

    Infrastructure creation has a huge potential for job creation, expanding commerce and a future emphasis on logistics and trade throughout the Central and Southern Africa region.

    Also, to reduce the dependence on imported oil and foreign currency, the country should switch to biofuels, solar and hydro energy sources.

    Now all he needs is a party. :)

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  2. Thought provoking and smart so I put him to the test with my my 6 and 16 year old kids him and the Obama very mild tv interview, and they thought theyd go for obama!
    my conclusion, I think he needs a PR adviser and all that goes with it! these days good talk just wont work everyone is looking for that extra obamite touch of class!!!!
    now thats just me trying to find out what makes a politician appealing and able to be understood by differnt people.

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  3. Right, he needs a great PR person or firm.

    There should be a lot of focus on getting people inside the MMD on board.

    I'm not sure how much in practice the MMD is locked up with the president's relatives or other MMD insiders.

    However, it would be great if Zambia was lead by a person with a clear economic vision for the country, that includes all the citizens in the economic process.

    And who doesn't believe in neoliberalism and freetrade, but sees the need to integrate the supply chain and keeps jobs inside the country.

    And it really doesn't matter what the name of the party is.

    The MMD could use quite a few lessons from the old UNIP. If they did that, they could create a party and a platform that is unbeatable.

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  4. I thought his last point about lawyers will not endear him to the current crop of political players...

    He said the country does not "lawyers" but engineers.

    When are we going to get away from this "profession" is more superior thing?

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  5. I thought his last point about lawyers will not endear him to the current crop of political players...

    He said the country does not "lawyers" but engineers.

    When are we going to get away from this "profession" is more superior thing?


    It was a political jab, but at the same time, there should be people with different kinds of expertise in government.

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  6. Part 4 is now up...For whatever reason, the chap who uploads these videos is doing a part each week. I'll keep adding them. So worth checking this post from time to time!

    Its a 10 part series.

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  7. Cho,

    Part 4 is now up...For whatever reason, the chap who uploads these videos is doing a part each week. I'll keep adding them. So worth checking this post from time to time! Its a 10 part series.

    This guy is the future of Zambia.

    He has been very wise to go straight for the ruling party, which massively increases his chances of success.

    If he gets elected, the country is going to have a very bright future.

    Value chains, supply chains, value added, those are the way to keep jobs in the country. Not 'free markets'.

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  8. He has clearly given it some thought.

    The new constitution will require presidential candidates to have "running mates".

    Leaving aside the merits of his preferred vehicle, I think realistically the best he can hope in MMD is VP.

    MMD have a lot of candidates with grass root support..Magande, Sondashi, Katele, Shikapwasha, Masebo, Chituwo, even Fundanga has been mentioned. All heavy weights.

    There's even a possibility of MMD - UPND marriage BEFORE the 2011 elections. The 50% + 1 requirement will force a lot of parties to merge given the need for wide appeal. A potential drawback to that process might be the possibility of the introduction of the Hybrid PR - FPTP system. That could still give incentives for small parties to remain if they can get within 10% or less of the national vote, to have a voice.

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  9. There's even a possibility of MMD - UPND marriage BEFORE the 2011 elections.

    A Chirwa-Hichilema combination would be interesting. :)

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  10. No that would be disastrous...combining an academic and a businessman...both with no prior experience of government at any level may sound like "change we can believe in"....but even Barack has some experience of the machinery of government...

    What would be good is if both of the chaps in question became MPs just for one term or even via a bye election.

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  11. I guess you're right.

    The real question would be who in the present MMD he would run with or for.

    They would have to be pretty up to date with business and development, not be died in the wool neoliberals, or simple political appointees who have served to shore up Levy Mwanawasa's security in office (i.e., the family tree).

    Rupiah Banda certainly has a world of experience - but would he want to be VP again? Or would he move up from VP to President? Maybe a combination of Banda as president and Chirwa not even VP, but as some kind of director for industrialisation and economic policy.

    Any other good candidates?

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  12. Analogous to Murray's comment on competition, I would say the political competition Zambia needs is across parties not within parties.

    In terms of candidates WITHIN MMD, I think Fundanga must be the obvious. I have heard though Inonge Mbikusita and others mentioned. I remain unconvinced.

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  13. In terms of candidates WITHIN MMD, I think Fundanga must be the obvious. I have heard though Inonge Mbikusita and others mentioned. I remain unconvinced.

    Caleb Fundanga expressed very little enthusiasm (in his interview) about the fact that the government of Zambia is coming into and extra $400 million of revenues because of the windfall tax on the mines. Which I found odd.

    He is also pretty elitist in his outlook, which is anathema to building an economy or society based around SME's.

    And he seems to support the whole neoliberal, free market philosophy.

    I'm not too familiar with the MMD leadership who aren't in the news all the time. :) Perhaps there are more old line MMD leaders who were not as enthusiastic about the whole neoliberal project?

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  14. I think the "neoliberal project" as you call it, swept the entire political spectrum.

    You would have to look to UNIP for relief with their state led approaches. We know where that took Zambia.

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  15. You don't have to be an all out socialist to believe in protecting domestic markets and be an economic protectionist.

    What would be helpful would be to have people in charge with enough confidence in Zambian entrepreneurs and businesses and graduates, to put them in the forefront of economic development, instead of the present belief that economic developoment can come from abroad.

    I think professor Ha-Joon Chang pretty much pointed out that protectionism and saturating local and regional markets before moving on to exports is not socialist or communist at all, but how both the US and UK created their economic prosperity.

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