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Saturday, 11 October 2008

Race to Plot 1 : Hakainde Hichilema

on his profile:


on the economy:


on national treasury:


on education :


on press freedom:


on infrastructure, constitution
:


on transparency, international relations

7 comments:

  1. Excellent interview. :)

    I think Hakainde Hichilema has a lot of excellent ideas. I would go even further, especially making sure that the mines pay more than their fair share.

    However, to me he looks like a very good candidate.

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  2. I found his discussion on the economy surprising illuminating :)

    Hakainde suggests that the key is "mining licenses"...he sees them as a form of "property right" that belongs to Zambians...in short a "mining license" is money...that idea is similar to the government's who charge $10,000 or more for it...

    But the difference with Hakainde is that he would give the licences to Zambians...and then let the market bid for it..inevitably transferring some rent from abroad into Zambians pockets..some even become joint owners....

    Its bold thinking...and certainly requires some thought...

    I would love to explore the idea with him...lol!

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  3. I welcome his plan of joint ventures between Zambians and foreign investors, especially in the mining sector. However, the devil may be in the details. A while ago on this forum I raised the issue of "Zambianisation" similar to the U.A.E's "Emiratisation" programme where all investments are joint ventures with locals.

    I think HH waffled a little at the beginning of the clip on the economy. He talked about locals saving in order to invest. Hmmm...

    Ok, there are people who are able to save, but that's the minority and not representative of the common Zambian. While it's a good idea to encourage saving for those who can, I expected HH to talk about giving people access to funds to begin with, so they can then start their own businesses.

    Speaking of which, he didn't mention encouraging entrepreneurship. I got the picture the investment he had in mind was these large conglomerates coming from abroad and partnering with locals. I expected to hear small business, unless I missed it.

    I also like the idea of public/private investment to re-energise the electric power problems.

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  4. Last sentence in my previous should have read: "I also like the idea of public/private investment to re-energise the electric power sector", not 'problems'

    ReplyDelete
  5. Cho,

    Hakainde suggests that the key is "mining licenses"...he sees them as a form of "property right" that belongs to Zambians...in short a "mining license" is money...that idea is similar to the government's who charge $10,000 or more for it...

    It is a good idea, and a fine counterpoint to the nonsense often uttered that 'mines are inherently worthless'.

    Without licenses, it is impossible to mine legally, so even the licenses are inherently valuable.

    What I would be concerned about is that this does not touch the lives of a lot of people, because most people are poor.

    The only way the country can develop is when policies are in place that actively involve the 70% of people who live on less than $1,- per day, and take actively involve the 80% of arable land that does uncultivated and the 97% of agriculture which depends on rainfall instead of permanent irrigation.

    I would like to hear more from the UPND about how they will set up works projects for infrastructure and agriculture. And how they are going to heavily tax the mines.


    Zedian,

    I think HH waffled a little at the beginning of the clip on the economy. He talked about locals saving in order to invest. Hmmm...

    Ok, there are people who are able to save, but that's the minority and not representative of the common Zambian. While it's a good idea to encourage saving for those who can, I expected HH to talk about giving people access to funds to begin with, so they can then start their own businesses.


    HH has a lot of good ideas, but he doesn't quite seem to break free from the neoliberal mindset. The UPND should learn from UNIP's experience about infrastructure projects.

    However, he was going along a similar line when it comes to universal education and healthcare.

    But he does talk about a mixed economy, which is a start and a compromise between the MMD neoliberalism of the World Bank and UNIP's statism.

    The biggest difference anyone can make to the Zambian economy at this point, is to institute works projects that build infrastructure and agriculture, and that are paid for with momey from the mines. It would make huge inroads into the 70% unemployment, increase agricultural output, unlock the economic potential of much of the country (which HH talks about, when he addresses the remote parts of the country and their lack of accessibility) and lay the foundation for sound economic development in the future by opening up entire areas for agriculture.

    Zambia should be rich, so let's make it happen.

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  6. This guy seems to know what he is talking about. Unfortunately, our politics of Shake Shake and chitenges mean that he will not be voted into plot 1.

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  7. MrK, Kyambalesa

    I transferred your interesting exchange to
    Agenda for the next government? (Guest Blog) to allow others to pick it up.

    Hope that has not caused too much confusion, but I thought the "agenda" deserved much fuller discussion, and from the responses, it seems I was right!

    ReplyDelete

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