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Saturday, 13 March 2010

Quick notes

The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) has selected Smartmatic to provide the necessary technology for improvement of the electoral register in Zambia. Smartmatic will supply around  1,000 mobile electronic biometric registry units, known as PARkits. The company is not without controversy.

A bizarre debate in Uganda on what has caused a rise in population. The country's leading agency is arguing that the lack of electricity, especially in the rural countryside, is powering the record-breaking population growth rate : "The poor are reproducing themselves. A poor woman has eight children while the rich are producing 3-4".

A recent court ruling has finally given Swazi women the right to own and administer property in their own names. Many Swazi women married in community of property have been left in the cold by their husbands, who chase them out of their matrimonial homes or sell property without their knowledge. In some cases, the wives will have paid for the property but leave with nothing because it is registered in their husband’s name.

How food and water are driving a 21st-century African land grab. An Observer investigation reveals how rich countries faced by a global food shortage now farm an area double the size of the UK to guarantee supplies for their citizens.

The Church of England has allegedly divested from Vedanta Resources, owners of Konkola Copper Mines (KCM) after sustained pressure from campaigners and many Christian groups who contended the mining company is involved in unethical practices.

1 comment:

  1. A bizarre debate in Uganda on what has caused a rise in population. The country's leading agency is arguing that the lack of electricity, especially in the rural countryside, is powering the record-breaking population growth rate : "The poor are reproducing themselves. A poor woman has eight children while the rich are producing 3-4".

    The problem with the HIV/AIDS hypothesis in Uganda is that there has always been high population growth in Uganda, even during the so-called 'HIV/AIDS' epidemic, during which Uganda was called 'the epicenter of AIDS'.

    When population growth was high and remained high, the focus was quietly shifted to South Africa instead.

    The whole AIDS epidemic in Uganda has always been based on projections and statistical models of 'what should happen if...'.

    So instead of depopulation as was predicted, you get headlines like:

    Uganda: 'Population Pressure Affecting Aids Fight'

    It was clear very early on, that the decline in population that was supposed to result from the high 'HIV infection rate' (based on faulty surveys based on faulty testing procedures) was not materialising.

    Nearest Towns to Rakai District/Rakai Town that I have found population data for:

    Nearest Towns to Rakai District/Rakai Town that I have found population data for:
    Mbarara 41,031 (1991) 69,363 (2002) 97,500 (2008)
    Masaka 49,585 (1991) 67,768 (2002) 71,700 (2008)

    data source:
    (1980) provided by Axel Pieles.
    (1991) Uganda 1991 National Census Report (provided by Clive Thornton).
    (2002) (2008) Uganda Bureau of Statistics (web).

    ReplyDelete

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